Activities Quiz
1.

A human eats a deer. Which of these terms applies to the relationship between the human and the deer? (Activity 53A)

predation
competition
parasitism
commensalism
mutualism


2.

Humans and shark both eat fish. Which of these terms applies to the relationship between the human and the shark? (Activity 53A)

predation
competition
parasitism
commensalism
mutualism


3.

Humans who have pets tend to be healthier than humans who do not have pets. Which of these terms applies to the relationship between a human and a pet? (Activity 53A)

predation
competition
parasitism
commensalism
mutualism


4.

Which of these terms applies to the relationship between a dog and a blood-sucking tick? (Activity 53A)

predation
competition
parasitism
commensalism
mutualism


5.

An egret eats insects stirred up by grazing animals. Which of these terms applies to the relationship between the egret and the grazing animal? (Activity 53A)

predation
competition
parasitism
commensalism
mutualism


6.

In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. (Activity 53B)

producers
primary consumers
secondary consumers
tertiary consumers
detritivores


7.

An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. (Activity 53B)

producer
primary consumer
secondary consumer
tertiary consumer
detritivore


8.

When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. (Activity 53B)

producer
primary consumer
secondary consumer
tertiary consumer
detritivore


9.

A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. (Activity 53B)

producer
primary consumer
secondary consumer
tertiary consumer
detritivore


10.

A human who just ate a hamburger is eaten by a shark while swimming. The shark is acting as a _____. (Activity 53B)

producer
primary consumer
secondary consumer
tertiary consumer
detritivore


11.

Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? (Activity 53C)

a surface exposed by a retreating glacier
abandoned farmland
an abandoned city
a neglected yard
none of these is a starting point for primary succession


12.

According to island biogeography, what is the relationship between an island's distance from the mainland and the number of species present on the island? (Activity 53D)

The closer an island is to the mainland, the fewer the number of species found on the island.
The further an island is from the mainland, the larger the number of species found on the island.
The further an island is from the mainland, the fewer the number of species found on the island.
The closer an island is to the mainland, the fewer the number of species found on the island; and the further an island is from the mainland, the larger the number of species found on the island.
There is no relationship between the distance from the mainland and the number of species found on an island.


13.

Why is a new island more hospitable to colonizers than an older island is? (Activity 53D)

Competition is more intense on the newer island.
Predation is less of a factor on older islands.
The extinction rate is higher on the newer island.
Competition is less intense on the newer island.
The intensity of both competition and predation is less on the newer island.


14.

What is the relationship between colonizing success and the number of species already established on an island? (Activity 53D)

As the number of established species on an island decreases, colonizing success also decreases.
There is no relationship between the number of established species on an island and colonizing success.
As the number of established species on an island increases, colonizing success also decreases.
As the number of established species on an island increases, colonizing success also increases.
As the number of established species on an island decreases, colonizing success also decreases; and as the number of established species on an island increases, colonizing success also increases.


15.

The number of species on an island remains relatively constant when _____. (Activity 53D)

the rate of successful colonization is less than the extinction rate
the rate of successful colonization equals the extinction rate
the rate of successful colonization is greater than the extinction rate
species richness increases
none of these occur



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2002 Pearson Education, Inc.,
publishing as Benjamin Cummings